Support Us in promoting Free Digital Education in Rural India | Milaap

Support Us in promoting Free Digital Education in Rural India

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Free- Education With Modern Education in  Rural Area (Included Yoga, Meditation)
Our Vision :
Smart & Digital Education (Starting From Nursery)
•Online Streaming Classes
•Live Camera
•Each class will have a Large Screen Smart TV
•Teacher, Care taker
•Provide healthy food and filtered water to drink during school time.
•Books and dresses are free of cost
•Teaching Languages- Hindi, Sanskrit & English
• Teaching with social distance.
•Follow Covid-19 Guidelines
Lack of modern education in rural area. Many of children's areWanted to learn but there is no facility of education in many villages.
While the education system in urban areas is not in a top shape as well, it is the rural education scenario which is the benchmark of a country’s progress.
According to the Annual Status of Education Report (ASER), the number of students going to school in rural India is increasing. However, more than 50% of the students in the 5th standard is not capable of reading a text book of 2nd standard. They do not know how to solve basic mathematical problems.
Hence, instead of focusing on uplifting literacy rate, it is time that we focus on quality education. Children are required to empower with the quality education and the knowledge that can be applied in their real life.
“If compared with the urban India, the state of education is worse in rural parts of the India. It is important that we realise and acknowledge the fact that a huge segment of our population still resides in rural India which makes it very crucial to pay heed to them.”

1.Promote computer literacy
Our country is progressing technologically; however, sadly, the imprint of this advancement has yet not reached to the rural areas. This has led to a digital gap in urban-rural India.
The schools in rural India are required to get equipped with computer education and need to be imparted with technological education as well.
This will help them being at par with the level of urban education and develop themselves better.
Even though the government is working to improve the state of education in the country, there is still a lot to be improved. There is a growing awareness among people about education; however the lack of infrastructure is being a major obstacle.
2. Bring innovative teaching methods
The level of education has gone a notch up in urban areas with newer teaching techniques being introduced; the state of teaching techniques is still primitive and traditional in rural India.
The rural schools are still stuck on inculcating rote learning in its students. This has to change.
These schools must start adopting concept learning to develop their students holistically.
3. Vedic Education
The Vedas, meaning knowledge in Sanskrit, are the oldest known Sanskrit scriptures. They are a body of texts attributed to ancient sages or rishis. The Vedas were usually taught at gurukuls. Gurukul was a residential schooling system popular in ancient India. At the gurukul, all were considered equal. The guru (teacher) and shishya (students) lived in the same house or near each other. This relationship was considered sacred and no fee was taken from the students. Students typically attended the gurukul from age of 8 into their early twenties. At the end of their education, each student offered a gurudakshina, a token or mark of respect to the teacher. It was usually money or a special task that the teacher required. The gurukul was otherwise supported by public donations.
Before the British rule, gurukuls were the preferred form of education in India. During colonial times, the British imported their centralized system of industrial-era education while systematically de-emphasising Vedic education. However, lately this ancient form of education is seeing renewed interest.
Vedic Education
-History
The Vedas, meaning knowledge in Sanskrit, are the oldest known Sanskrit scriptures. They are a body of texts attributed to ancient sages or rishis. The Vedas were usually taught at gurukuls. Gurukul was a residential schooling system popular in ancient India. At the gurukul, all were considered equal. The guru (teacher) and shishya (students) lived in the same house or near each other. This relationship was considered sacred and no fee was taken from the students. Students typically attended the gurukul from age of 8 into their early twenties. At the end of their education, each student offered a gurudakshina, a token or mark of respect to the teacher. It was usually money or a special task that the teacher required. The gurukul was otherwise supported by public donations.
Before the British rule, gurukuls were the preferred form of education in India. During colonial times, the British imported their centralized system of industrial-era education while systematically de-emphasising Vedic education. However, lately this ancient form of education is seeing renewed interest.
-Personality Development
In Vedic education, one’s personality was developed through self realization and self respect. The end goal was to build self awareness ie. knowing oneself intimately. Good judgement had to be developed through practice. Daily tasks focused on physical, mental, and emotional development. Students built their personalities in a multi dimensional manner.
-Character Formation
Ancient Indians did not believe that intellect alone was important. Morality was equally necessary. Learning divided from morality was considered useless. Vedic education helped form character by encouraging a simple life. Students were Brahmachari (celibate) as long as they were learning. Their lives ran according to a strict schedule. Pleasures, comforts and luxuries were seen as unnecessary. Plain food, good behaviour and high ideals were encouraged. The gurus did not only teach the students but watched over their moral behaviour as well.
-Preservation and Spread of Culture
A large part of the Veda's is dedicated to traditions, cultures and rituals. Preservation of the literary and cultural traditions was necessary. Education was seen as the means to pass traditions to the next generation. Hence, the students were taught that they owed three debts — to the gods, to the past gurus, and to their ancestors. The students learned to serve the gods, which paid the first debt. The second was paid by learning the teachings of past intellectuals. The third debt to the ancestors was paid by raising children and educating them. Thus, all the traditions were preserved and passed on.
How will we invest these funds?
1. We will invest to purchase land to make our project successful.
2. We will invest funds to Build Classroom.
3. We will invest funds to the management of staff for making this project successful.

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Rs.501 raised

Goal: Rs.2,700,000

2 Days to go

Beneficiary: Malti Devi info_outline

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Anonymous donated Rs.501