Join Us To Save Indian Native Birds | Milaap
This is a supporting campaign. Contributions made to this campaign will go towards the main campaign.
This campaign has stopped and can no longer accept donations.

Join Us To Save Indian Native Birds

Every year 12+ lakh Indian native birds die due to human made causes.
Our mission is clear: to conserve native birds and their habitats across India. In doing so, we benefit not only Indian birds but all other species as well.

WHY BIRD CONSERVATION IS IMPORTANT?


The latest International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Birds (2013) shows that fifteen bird species in India continue to be Critically Endangered (CR). Moreover, three other bird species now face greater danger than before. These species have been up listed to Near Threatened (NT) and Vulnerable (VU) categories.


 These birds are now considered extinct for all practical purposes. The species that have been unlisted (facing greater danger) in 2013 IUCN list are:

1. River Lapwing and River Tern, both unlisted from Least Concern to Near Threatened.

2. Long-tailed Duck unlisted from Least Concern to Vulnerable. Destruction of wetlands and riverine habitats has been the cause of decline of these species. 

Commenting on the state of affairs, BNHS-India Director, Dr Asad Rahmani said, “There is an urgent need to conserve the remaining habitats and species dependent on them, based on insightful scientific field research. Policies that ensure this through sustainable development should be framed and implemented urgently”.

PROBLEM:

1) EXTINCTION:

Hundreds of bird species are on a track toward extinction. If these species blink out, we’ll have just one species to blame: ours.  A casual observer might not notice, but take a closer look. Across India, fewer birds inhabit our landscapes. Some familiar birds, like the Wood Thrush, are 50 percent less common than they were 50 years ago. This thrush is just one of dozens of native bird species in India that may face extinction in the next decades, if current trends continue. In fact, across East India, 12 percent of 4,230 bird species are declining in population and headed for extinction in our lifetimes without immediate conservation action.


2) HABITAT LOSS: 

Rain-forests are felled. Woodlots become parking lots. With so much habitat loss, is it any wonder many bird species are in decline? These are the impacts of habitat loss and poor habitat management, often unnoticed but in fact the biggest cause of bird declines. Over the past 150 years, as the world has industrialized and the human population has soared past 7 billion, our landscapes have changed dramatically: To stabilize bird populations and prevent extinctions, it's critical that we find the most effective ways to save habitat and influence best management practices. Fortunately, these are some of the things IBC does best.

3) PESTICIDES:


They are readily available on store shelves, used on everything from produce to pets. But many pesticides have harmful, even deadly, impacts. Thousands of Swainson's Hawks were found dead in agricultural fields in Tamil Nadu in the mid-2001. When the mystery was solved, a commonly used pesticide was identified as the culprit. It's just one example of pesticides marketed as “safe” later being deemed deadly, and it's why our Pesticides Program works so hard to eliminate toxic chemicals. The rat poison d-CON is another example. It was long ago discovered to be deadly to predators, like hawks and owls. These rap-tors die after eating rodents sickened by the poison. It took many years of advocacy and legal action to convince the maker to pull the worst of these products from retail shelves.

4) FISHERIES:

People across the globe consume fish caught by fisheries. But many bird species—from Kingfisher to albatrosses—need fish to survive. Seabirds—species like Laysan Albatross and Pink-footed Shear water—are “off the radar” for most people. We simply don't think about these birds that spend most of their lives over the open ocean. That's why it may come as a surprise to realize that human activities and fisheries in particular are a taking a great toll on these long-lived birds, now the most threatened group of birds on Earth. Dual Threat: Overfishing and By catch Overfishing is depleting many seabirds' main food. In recent years, fisheries have begun to take not only fish for people to eat, but harvesting ever-smaller forage fish as feed for cattle and pigs. This means even fewer fish for seabirds to eat. A related threat is “bycatch,” when fisheries accidentally catch wildlife other than fish, like sea turtles and dolphins. Few realize that seabirds, including the critically endangered Waved Albatross, are among fisheries' unintended victims. Among fishing methods, longlines with hundreds or even thousands or baited hooks kill at least 320,000 seabirds yearly. Gillnets, which can stretch for a mile in length, take at least 400,000. Because of a lack of data, these figures probably represent an extreme low end of the spectrum.

5)CLIMATE CHANGE:

Climate change is already affecting birds and their habitats. We’re acting to conserve birds in ways that also reduce carbon emissions. As a looming threat to birds and human civilization, global climate change will be an increasing focus of conservation in the coming decades. Birds that are already rare and declining will face additional risk as some current threats intensify, such as degradation or loss of habitat and spread of invasive species. More frequent and severe weather events may further stress bird populations. Changes in climate patterns can upset the synchronization of bird migrations, such as the arrival of Red Knots on traditional feeding grounds on the Delaware Bay when horseshoe crab eggs are most abundant. The destruction of forests releases carbon and hastens climate change. Studies show that deforestation accounts for 14 percent of all human-caused greenhouse gas emissions. Conversely, reforestation and preventing deforestation are two strategies we can take to slow climate change. Many of our bird conservation projects protect carbon-rich tropical forests. For example, by creating or expanding 90 bird reserves, we have protected nearly one million acres, keeping forest carbon in the ground. Our tree-planting efforts restore forests that help to keep our climate stable. In one area ofalone, more than one million trees have been planted.

6) LACK OF RESOURCES:

Lots of people love birds. Even so, lack of financial resources and political will threaten the measures needed to protect them. Are Birds Out of Sight, Out of Mind? People tend to see at least a few species of birds in their daily lives. As a result, most people don't realize that how many less-frequently-observed bird species are at risk of extinction. We believe this lack of awareness translates to a lack of resources for birds. Still fewer people probably realize that protecting birds means protecting habitats that support a vast array of plants and other wildlife. When we take action to protect a bird species like Blue-billed Curassow or Cerulean Warbler, entire ecosystems are preserved. These protected places help people, too, by ensuring sources of fresh water and slowing climate change.

What does the Indian Bird Conservancy - IBC TEAM  do?

The IBC TEAM has created a far-reaching protection scheme for all of India's wild birds, identifying 194 species and sub-species (listed in Annex I) among them as particularly threatened and in need of special conservation measures. There are a number of components to this scheme:

Member States are required to designate Special Protection Areas (SPAs) for the 194 threatened species and all migratory bird species. SPAs are scientifically identified areas critical for the survival of the targeted species, such as wetlands. The SPAs form part of Natura 2000, India's network of protected nature sites, which was established in 1992. The designation of an area as a SPA gives it a high level of protection from potentially damaging developments.


A second component bans activities that directly threaten birds, such as the deliberate killing or capture of birds, the destruction of their nests and taking of their eggs, and associated activities such as trading in live or dead birds (with a few exceptions).
IBC's team found DEAD CRANE at OKLHA INDUSTRIAL AREA NEW DELHI


Who'll get benefitted?

Indian Native Birds. The funds directly goes to conserve native birds and their habitats across India. In doing so, we benefit not only Indian birds but all other species as well.

One species after another is losing the safety net provided by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Now, the Farm Bill and Interior Appropriations Bill include language that would exempt species from ESA protection or reduce habitat protection for currently listed species.









WHY BIRDS HAVE TO BE SAVED?
WHY BIRDS HAVE TO BE SAVED?
Ask for an update
9th March 2020
It had been a few months since we update anything in fundraising.

2019 was very saddened to Indian birds and wildlife. We lost thousands of innocent creatures and the Sambhar lake tragedy was horrible. Here is an incredible story of Ms.Rachana Rishi:

I still vividly remember the day on the lower berth of a train, as I looked out of the train window. I let out a tiny shriek and muttered “black-winged stilt” as I recognized a familiar bird out in the swamps next to the tracks, like a wide-eyed child who had spotted her favorite candy. The scenery soon changed with the rhythmic beats of the train switching its tracks, but the memory of that bird remained.
My first sighting of this species was my first day at the Phulera nursery where our animal rescue team had set up a temporary shelter for the treatment and rehabilitation of distressed birds. There it was, together with fellow avian travelers, paralyzed and gasping for air. It was clear that veterinary intervention had to be done without any further delay. They were stressed, diseased, 4000 kilometers away from their breeding grounds unable to take flight; the one thing that birds count on to escape danger.

Sambar-Jaipur_16.11.19_Rachana Rishi-73

Seasonal migration, in birds, refers to the periodic transboundary movement of a species from one place to the other in search of resources or for breeding. Now one might question the need for an energy extensive voyage to the tropical regions just for some food or warmth. However, this energy investment in flying long distances has wonderful returns. A relatively warm Indian winter welcomes these birds with an environment plush with mosquitoes, flies, insect larvae and other avian delicacies. Large Wetlands also have social value as staging and feeding grounds for congregational gatherings of these migrants. This was a role fulfilled by Sambhar lake, Rajasthan for the longest time. Until this year…Avian botulism is caused by the bacteria Clostridium botulinum that produces a toxin. This bacterium reproduces through spores that remain dormant in water bodies under normal aerobic conditions. 


Sambar-Jaipur_16.11.19_Rachana Rishi-72

In Sambhar, it slowly concentrated in microscopic aquatic organisms that filter feed sediments or water. When birds at Sambhar ate the organisms, the toxin accumulated in their bodies. This year, climate change led to increased rainfall, thereby increasing the groundwater level, which reached the lake brim. This along with other anthropogenic factors led to the proliferation of the bacteria in Sambhar lake.


It was a catastrophe waiting to happen. Many scientists, environmentalists, and even locals had seen the changes in the wetland over the course of the few years. The growing need for water in the catchment region of the lake led to the construction of dams, thereby disrupting natural water inflow. Moreover, illegal salt mining altered the pH and microbiological ecology of the lake. Scientists even recommended a geochemical study to understand the repercussions of such changes. However, these recommendations were left unheeded, lost somewhere in the system.



Birds such as black-winged stilts, pied avocets, Northern shovelers, common coots, common teals and even the teensy little Kentish Plovers were the refugees in our temporary facility at Kachorda.
 The Indian Bird Conservancy team, in collaboration with Hope & beyond, Raksha, Animal Husbandry Department, and Forest Department committed over a month of full-time strenuous efforts to ensure the treatment of as many of the admitted birds as could be treated and released safely. The timely intervention resulted in many of them responding to the treatment.
The team began work on 12th November 2019; with the shelter almost inundated with distressed, sick birds. At that stage, all stakeholder was unprepared and shocked by the sheer admissions every day. Pooling in resources and through the help of the HCL Foundation, the Phulera nursery was converted to a fully functional avian hospital with triage and necessary equipment. Overnight the team grew with more helping hands on deck. Vets came in from not only
Indian Bird Conservancy but across the country to help save the birds. An incident command system that allowed for delegation of work across the team was established. All volunteers were briefed on the protocols and best practices in handling and management of the birds.
The team awakened with the birds at 6:30 am and often went to bed by 12-1 am after wrapping up the tasks at the shelter. Perpetual physical and mental exhaustion during those days resulted in me seeing birds everywhere. During my rescue work, of course, I was with them. But even during the breaks, during transit, I would often imagine a bird in the silhouette of a log, in the shadow cast on the wall at night, everywhere. The symptoms these birds had were gruesome to watch. One could only imagine what the creatures were going through. To comprehend this, one has to know what happens to the birds as the toxin starts to affect their body. It first aims for motor functions, so the wings are affected. Once the toxin has established dominance by disallowing the bird to fly, it is left to the mercy of this bacterium. Slowly, the toxicity increases leading to further paralysis of the limbs, at this stage the bird cannot relocate even if it sees a predator around.



Worse is when a crow approaches the bird. The crow is hungry and it has spotted some easy food. It will attempt to approach the bird, judging by its cognizance, and calculatedly aim for the tail flesh of the paralyzed bird. We received many such birds, which were eaten alive, preyed on while they helplessly awaited death. I remember thinking about 127 hours, the movie. The parallel between the protagonist and his will to survive was just as stark as the bird’s sheer tenacity to live on. It was a hopeful tale to watch unfold.


Sambar-Jaipur_16.11.19_Rachana Rishi-74

With the Thirteenth Session of the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals being held in Gandhinagar, IBC recognized an opportunity to voice the threats faced by these birds in a side event during the convention. When the theme of the conference is ‘Migratory species connect the planet and together we welcome them home’, one’s blood does boil upon seeing the injustice done to over 20,000 of these guests. Just like humans, animals do not plan for their vacations to go horribly wrong. In such matters, it is crucial for stakeholders to recognize their roles and join hands to help save these beings, to avoid any wildlife refugee crisis in the future.

The teams safely treated over 1200 birds. Of these, we released 514 during this rescue We cannot predict if this incident will change the migratory behavior or breeding grounds of the birds, however, if they do ever face this problem again, we will be prepared.
It had been a few months since we update anything in fundraising.

2019 was very saddened to Indian birds and wildlife. We lost thousands of innocent creatures and the Sambhar lake tragedy was horrible. Here is an incredible story of Ms.Rachana Rishi:

I still vividly remember the day on the lower berth of a train, as I looked out of the train window. I let out a tiny shriek and muttered “black-winged stilt” as I recognized a familiar bird out in the swamps next to the tracks, like a wide-eyed child who had spotted her favorite candy. The scenery soon changed with the rhythmic beats of the train switching its tracks, but the memory of that bird remained.
My first sighting of this species was my first day at the Phulera nursery where our animal rescue team had set up a temporary shelter for the treatment and rehabilitation of distressed birds. There it was, together with fellow avian travelers, paralyzed and gasping for air. It was clear that veterinary intervention had to be done without any further delay. They were stressed, diseased, 4000 kilometers away from their breeding grounds unable to take flight; the one thing that birds count on to escape danger.

Sambar-Jaipur_16.11.19_Rachana Rishi-73

Seasonal migration, in birds, refers to the periodic transboundary movement of a species from one place to the other in search of resources or for breeding. Now one might question the need for an energy extensive voyage to the tropical regions just for some food or warmth. However, this energy investment in flying long distances has wonderful returns. A relatively warm Indian winter welcomes these birds with an environment plush with mosquitoes, flies, insect larvae and other avian delicacies. Large Wetlands also have social value as staging and feeding grounds for congregational gatherings of these migrants. This was a role fulfilled by Sambhar lake, Rajasthan for the longest time. Until this year…Avian botulism is caused by the bacteria Clostridium botulinum that produces a toxin. This bacterium reproduces through spores that remain dormant in water bodies under normal aerobic conditions. 


Sambar-Jaipur_16.11.19_Rachana Rishi-72

In Sambhar, it slowly concentrated in microscopic aquatic organisms that filter feed sediments or water. When birds at Sambhar ate the organisms, the toxin accumulated in their bodies. This year, climate change led to increased rainfall, thereby increasing the groundwater level, which reached the lake brim. This along with other anthropogenic factors led to the proliferation of the bacteria in Sambhar lake.


It was a catastrophe waiting to happen. Many scientists, environmentalists, and even locals had seen the changes in the wetland over the course of the few years. The growing need for water in the catchment region of the lake led to the construction of dams, thereby disrupting natural water inflow. Moreover, illegal salt mining altered the pH and microbiological ecology of the lake. Scientists even recommended a geochemical study to understand the repercussions of such changes. However, these recommendations were left unheeded, lost somewhere in the system.



Birds such as black-winged stilts, pied avocets, Northern shovelers, common coots, common teals and even the teensy little Kentish Plovers were the refugees in our temporary facility at Kachorda.
 The Indian Bird Conservancy team, in collaboration with Hope & beyond, Raksha, Animal Husbandry Department, and Forest Department committed over a month of full-time strenuous efforts to ensure the treatment of as many of the admitted birds as could be treated and released safely. The timely intervention resulted in many of them responding to the treatment.
The team began work on 12th November 2019; with the shelter almost inundated with distressed, sick birds. At that stage, all stakeholder was unprepared and shocked by the sheer admissions every day. Pooling in resources and through the help of the HCL Foundation, the Phulera nursery was converted to a fully functional avian hospital with triage and necessary equipment. Overnight the team grew with more helping hands on deck. Vets came in from not only
Indian Bird Conservancy but across the country to help save the birds. An incident command system that allowed for delegation of work across the team was established. All volunteers were briefed on the protocols and best practices in handling and management of the birds.
The team awakened with the birds at 6:30 am and often went to bed by 12-1 am after wrapping up the tasks at the shelter. Perpetual physical and mental exhaustion during those days resulted in me seeing birds everywhere. During my rescue work, of course, I was with them. But even during the breaks, during transit, I would often imagine a bird in the silhouette of a log, in the shadow cast on the wall at night, everywhere. The symptoms these birds had were gruesome to watch. One could only imagine what the creatures were going through. To comprehend this, one has to know what happens to the birds as the toxin starts to affect their body. It first aims for motor functions, so the wings are affected. Once the toxin has established dominance by disallowing the bird to fly, it is left to the mercy of this bacterium. Slowly, the toxicity increases leading to further paralysis of the limbs, at this stage the bird cannot relocate even if it sees a predator around.



Worse is when a crow approaches the bird. The crow is hungry and it has spotted some easy food. It will attempt to approach the bird, judging by its cognizance, and calculatedly aim for the tail flesh of the paralyzed bird. We received many such birds, which were eaten alive, preyed on while they helplessly awaited death. I remember thinking about 127 hours, the movie. The parallel between the protagonist and his will to survive was just as stark as the bird’s sheer tenacity to live on. It was a hopeful tale to watch unfold.


Sambar-Jaipur_16.11.19_Rachana Rishi-74

With the Thirteenth Session of the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals being held in Gandhinagar, IBC recognized an opportunity to voice the threats faced by these birds in a side event during the convention. When the theme of the conference is ‘Migratory species connect the planet and together we welcome them home’, one’s blood does boil upon seeing the injustice done to over 20,000 of these guests. Just like humans, animals do not plan for their vacations to go horribly wrong. In such matters, it is crucial for stakeholders to recognize their roles and join hands to help save these beings, to avoid any wildlife refugee crisis in the future.

The teams safely treated over 1200 birds. Of these, we released 514 during this rescue We cannot predict if this incident will change the migratory behavior or breeding grounds of the birds, however, if they do ever face this problem again, we will be prepared.
27th November 2019
Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar Lake


A tragedy of epic proportions unfolded at Sambhar Lake, Rajasthan last week. It all started with regular birders reporting deaths of hundreds of birds, many of these of migratory species that quickly escalated to thousands. This unprecedented wildlife emergency called for swift action even when the cause of such mass scale deaths was unknown.

Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar Lake
Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar Lake

Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar Lake

Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar Lake

Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar Lake



Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar Lake

Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar LakeWhile thousand of birds

Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar Lakewere collected and buried

Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar Lake(17000 at last count), local rescuers started bringing in those that were found alive and our senior veterinarian Dr Disha Sharma joined the team immediately. The birds were initially taken to Jaipur for treatment but to save on transit time, IBC in collaboration with Raksha, a local organisation set up a temporary treatment facility to Kachroda Forest Nursery, Phulera.
 


The cause of mass scale deaths is still to be ascertained though initial diagnosis pointed to avian botulism (Source: Apex Center for Animal Disease investigation, monitoring and surveillance, Rajasthan University of Veterinary and Animal sciences, Bikaner) but our teams are doing their best to save as many lives as they can. Symptoms witnessed included wing movement freeze rendering them unable to fly, followed by leg paralysis with gasping before the birds pass out. Freshwater birds have not been affected.
With an unknown cause of such mass scale deaths, it is critical to create enclosures and aviaries to house the birds recovering after veterinary interventions. Artificial ponds have been created for waterfowl and aviaries for many other species. A few critically ill birds were also given infra-red rays.
Good rainfall has resulted in a large number of water bodies that have attracted a huge number of migratory birds to this landscape. Common coot, Northern shovelers, Kentish plover, Black winged stilt, Common teal, lesser flamingo, Little Stint, Ruff are a few species admitted for treatment and more rescued birds are still arriving. The team had so far rescued 480 birds of which 186 succumbed to death before treatment. As on today, the temporary rescue centre at Kachroda has around 290 birds showing healthy signs of recovery while the forest department prepares new aviaries to prepare them for release at another safe location.


There is another set of people who have the onerous task of picking up dead birds as they comb through the area and it can be anybody’s guess how many more would have died in the water or in other parts of this region that search parties have not yet reached.
Under Rapid Action Project, we support local organisations to deal with such wildlife emergencies, without delay ensuring quick action and appropriate scientific response. Our Emergency Relief Network comprises organisations and individuals who are the first res-ponders in times of wildlife emergencies. 
Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar Lake


A tragedy of epic proportions unfolded at Sambhar Lake, Rajasthan last week. It all started with regular birders reporting deaths of hundreds of birds, many of these of migratory species that quickly escalated to thousands. This unprecedented wildlife emergency called for swift action even when the cause of such mass scale deaths was unknown.

Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar Lake
Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar Lake

Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar Lake

Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar Lake

Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar Lake



Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar Lake

Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar LakeWhile thousand of birds

Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar Lakewere collected and buried

Wildlife Emergency as Thousands of Birds Die in Sambhar Lake(17000 at last count), local rescuers started bringing in those that were found alive and our senior veterinarian Dr Disha Sharma joined the team immediately. The birds were initially taken to Jaipur for treatment but to save on transit time, IBC in collaboration with Raksha, a local organisation set up a temporary treatment facility to Kachroda Forest Nursery, Phulera.
 


The cause of mass scale deaths is still to be ascertained though initial diagnosis pointed to avian botulism (Source: Apex Center for Animal Disease investigation, monitoring and surveillance, Rajasthan University of Veterinary and Animal sciences, Bikaner) but our teams are doing their best to save as many lives as they can. Symptoms witnessed included wing movement freeze rendering them unable to fly, followed by leg paralysis with gasping before the birds pass out. Freshwater birds have not been affected.
With an unknown cause of such mass scale deaths, it is critical to create enclosures and aviaries to house the birds recovering after veterinary interventions. Artificial ponds have been created for waterfowl and aviaries for many other species. A few critically ill birds were also given infra-red rays.
Good rainfall has resulted in a large number of water bodies that have attracted a huge number of migratory birds to this landscape. Common coot, Northern shovelers, Kentish plover, Black winged stilt, Common teal, lesser flamingo, Little Stint, Ruff are a few species admitted for treatment and more rescued birds are still arriving. The team had so far rescued 480 birds of which 186 succumbed to death before treatment. As on today, the temporary rescue centre at Kachroda has around 290 birds showing healthy signs of recovery while the forest department prepares new aviaries to prepare them for release at another safe location.


There is another set of people who have the onerous task of picking up dead birds as they comb through the area and it can be anybody’s guess how many more would have died in the water or in other parts of this region that search parties have not yet reached.
Under Rapid Action Project, we support local organisations to deal with such wildlife emergencies, without delay ensuring quick action and appropriate scientific response. Our Emergency Relief Network comprises organisations and individuals who are the first res-ponders in times of wildlife emergencies. 
11th October 2019
Guarding the rain-forests of the sea by Coastal Schools in Mithapur: 

Often called as rain-forest of the sea, although coral reefs cover meagre 1% of the ocean floor, have a huge effect on the health of the rest of the world. Healthy corals equate to a healthy ocean. But for these corals to replenish and flourish well, it needs clean, clear water to survive.
Guarding the rain-forests of the sea by Coastal Schools in Mithapur: 
All over the world marine and coastal ecosystems are under tremendous pressure arising from natural as well as anthropocentric sources, causing considerable loss of biodiversity. Irresponsible dumping of solid waste along the shore is one such pollution causing behavior that can be contained with proper awareness among the masses. Participatory awareness generating events had been immensely effective in driving the message of conservation into public.

Guarding the rain-forests of the sea by Coastal Schools in Mithapur: 
The reef of Mithapur is home to about 250 diverse marine organisms. Around 350 families earn their livelihoods from direct and indirect dependence on the resources of the reef of Mithapur. The reef of Mithapur also attracts pods of Indian ocean hump-backed dolphins during the colder months every year. The coast of Mithapur is also a nesting site for green sea turtles.
The coast of Mithapur attracts people round the year seeking recreation and livelihoods alike. This coast also attracts people during certain seasons to perform certain religious rituals such as immersion of Ganesh idols. These activities cumulatively account to littering along the coast, often with plastic waste. Ghost nets are also a problem along this coast. Taking the fragile ecosystems of Mithapur such as coral reefs and sand dunes, it is imperative to educate people from coastal communities on the threats posed by plastic pollution on local biodiversity and ultimately effecting the livelihoods of people dependent on these ecosystems.


As an effort to commemorate the World Ocean Day on 8th June, 2019, coastal cleanup activities were conducted with the participation of students from TCL DAV Public School and Mithapur High School on 28th June, 2019 an 6th July, 2019 respectively. Students of these schools come from various walks of life but yet are connected to each other through their relationship with the coast. In view of their connection with the coast through various activities, it is important to impart conservation awareness into the families of these coastal dwellers. Both the events consisted of a small seminar where talks were delivered by Mr. Bhaskar Bhat, Sociologist of IBC and Mr. Satish Trivedi, Asst. Manager of TCSRD, TCL. Field sessions were held during the early hours of the day following the seminar.


Students were briefed about the precautions to be taken while on field and were divided onto groups of 3 students each. The groups of students were then asked to walk in a straight line parallel to the shore so that garbage can be collected in maximum transects, minimizing the chance of missing anything.

50 students from TCDAV Public School and 110 students from Mithapur High School had participated in these events and collected 200 and 300 kg of plastic waste respectively. Each participant was given a participation certificate so as to boost their morale.
Guarding the rain-forests of the sea by Coastal Schools in Mithapur: 

Often called as rain-forest of the sea, although coral reefs cover meagre 1% of the ocean floor, have a huge effect on the health of the rest of the world. Healthy corals equate to a healthy ocean. But for these corals to replenish and flourish well, it needs clean, clear water to survive.
Guarding the rain-forests of the sea by Coastal Schools in Mithapur: 
All over the world marine and coastal ecosystems are under tremendous pressure arising from natural as well as anthropocentric sources, causing considerable loss of biodiversity. Irresponsible dumping of solid waste along the shore is one such pollution causing behavior that can be contained with proper awareness among the masses. Participatory awareness generating events had been immensely effective in driving the message of conservation into public.

Guarding the rain-forests of the sea by Coastal Schools in Mithapur: 
The reef of Mithapur is home to about 250 diverse marine organisms. Around 350 families earn their livelihoods from direct and indirect dependence on the resources of the reef of Mithapur. The reef of Mithapur also attracts pods of Indian ocean hump-backed dolphins during the colder months every year. The coast of Mithapur is also a nesting site for green sea turtles.
The coast of Mithapur attracts people round the year seeking recreation and livelihoods alike. This coast also attracts people during certain seasons to perform certain religious rituals such as immersion of Ganesh idols. These activities cumulatively account to littering along the coast, often with plastic waste. Ghost nets are also a problem along this coast. Taking the fragile ecosystems of Mithapur such as coral reefs and sand dunes, it is imperative to educate people from coastal communities on the threats posed by plastic pollution on local biodiversity and ultimately effecting the livelihoods of people dependent on these ecosystems.


As an effort to commemorate the World Ocean Day on 8th June, 2019, coastal cleanup activities were conducted with the participation of students from TCL DAV Public School and Mithapur High School on 28th June, 2019 an 6th July, 2019 respectively. Students of these schools come from various walks of life but yet are connected to each other through their relationship with the coast. In view of their connection with the coast through various activities, it is important to impart conservation awareness into the families of these coastal dwellers. Both the events consisted of a small seminar where talks were delivered by Mr. Bhaskar Bhat, Sociologist of IBC and Mr. Satish Trivedi, Asst. Manager of TCSRD, TCL. Field sessions were held during the early hours of the day following the seminar.


Students were briefed about the precautions to be taken while on field and were divided onto groups of 3 students each. The groups of students were then asked to walk in a straight line parallel to the shore so that garbage can be collected in maximum transects, minimizing the chance of missing anything.

50 students from TCDAV Public School and 110 students from Mithapur High School had participated in these events and collected 200 and 300 kg of plastic waste respectively. Each participant was given a participation certificate so as to boost their morale.
Content Disclaimer: The information and opinions, expressed in this fundraiser page are those of the campaign organiser or users, and not Milaap.
If such claims are found to be not true, Milaap, in its sole discretion, has the right to stop the fundraiser, and refund donations to respective donors.
Rs.0 raised

Goal: Rs.300,000

Beneficiary: Indian Bird Con... info_outline