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7th December 2017
Dear all

First a big thank your contribution.
We had some spare funds and we'd given to Flag day fund.
This fund is run by independent Army body called Zila Sainik Parishad and the funds are used for
a) Widows medical benefits
b) Children's education
c) Family Rehabilitation
d) Other unexpected emergencies for war widows or their families

We've just received a plaque at a function (on all your behalf) that was attended by The Governor of Mumbai, all 3 armed forces Chiefs in Mumbai.
It was a moving moment for me because I know I would not have been able to do this without you.

Thank you so much for your generosity




Dear all

First a big thank your contribution.
We had some spare funds and we'd given to Flag day fund.
This fund is run by independent Army body called Zila Sainik Parishad and the funds are used for
a) Widows medical benefits
b) Children's education
c) Family Rehabilitation
d) Other unexpected emergencies for war widows or their families

We've just received a plaque at a function (on all your behalf) that was attended by The Governor of Mumbai, all 3 armed forces Chiefs in Mumbai.
It was a moving moment for me because I know I would not have been able to do this without you.

Thank you so much for your generosity




14th August 2017
Dear Supporters,

This time Mission AWE is working for Zila Sainik office - Pune....
1971: Tarabhai Wokhar Balwant widow of Sreeman Wokhar Sopana Balwant. Married at 15, first child at 17, widowed at 18.

Many of us cannot imagine this. But this is the true life of many of the widows of the Sipahis of the 1965-1970s wars that India fought.

“You know, we had come to our village on the outskirts of Pune after my son was born. My husband was building a house there for us to live in. One afternoon as he laid bricks, the postman brought the letter. The Indo-Pak war had started and he had to go. He laughed and said – “Bas, I’ll beat them all and be back before you know it.”

Sreeman Balwant went to Bangladesh with his battalion to fight the 1971 Indo-Pak war. Within a few days, the news of his death was delivered by the same postman. Tarabai remembers that day and Sreeman Balwant’s smile, but little else. The grind of life after he was gone is more vivid for her than the happiness they had shared together.

“My son was 1 when Shreeman died. He has no memory of this father. I also only remember his smile before he left for the war,” says Sopana.

The family plunged into financial difficulty. The government supported her with 10 acres of land. Tarabai worked in the fields. But aging parents and in-laws and a growing son meant expenses beyond what she could manage. So, she worked at other odd jobs as well  – sometimes it was working in the fields for hours to till the land, sow and harvest the crop; at other times it was overtime work in a factory in conditions far from healthy. Money was difficult to find, and ugly male advances were easy. But Tarabai stood her ground.

But life will not let up for her!
Today at 64, she stands alone  – no savings, just the pension and a son who passed away two years ago in 2015 due to a critical illness. She now lives alone.

Here’s what Tarabhai would do if she received the money (translated): “If I got some money, I would first pay my bills, my rent, and use that money to buy medicines. People like us don’t have it in our fate to see so much money, so I will thank god that so many people read my story and reached out to support me” 

Most widows of Sipahis like Tarabhai are widowed at the age when children learn how to spell the word marriage. They brave loneliness, harassment and grinding hard work to single-handedly hold together their families. They work long hours to put food on the mat, and live a long life filled with loneliness even before they turn 30.

Please help me make give them the dignity they deserve

Thank you !
Dear Supporters,

This time Mission AWE is working for Zila Sainik office - Pune....
1971: Tarabhai Wokhar Balwant widow of Sreeman Wokhar Sopana Balwant. Married at 15, first child at 17, widowed at 18.

Many of us cannot imagine this. But this is the true life of many of the widows of the Sipahis of the 1965-1970s wars that India fought.

“You know, we had come to our village on the outskirts of Pune after my son was born. My husband was building a house there for us to live in. One afternoon as he laid bricks, the postman brought the letter. The Indo-Pak war had started and he had to go. He laughed and said – “Bas, I’ll beat them all and be back before you know it.”

Sreeman Balwant went to Bangladesh with his battalion to fight the 1971 Indo-Pak war. Within a few days, the news of his death was delivered by the same postman. Tarabai remembers that day and Sreeman Balwant’s smile, but little else. The grind of life after he was gone is more vivid for her than the happiness they had shared together.

“My son was 1 when Shreeman died. He has no memory of this father. I also only remember his smile before he left for the war,” says Sopana.

The family plunged into financial difficulty. The government supported her with 10 acres of land. Tarabai worked in the fields. But aging parents and in-laws and a growing son meant expenses beyond what she could manage. So, she worked at other odd jobs as well  – sometimes it was working in the fields for hours to till the land, sow and harvest the crop; at other times it was overtime work in a factory in conditions far from healthy. Money was difficult to find, and ugly male advances were easy. But Tarabai stood her ground.

But life will not let up for her!
Today at 64, she stands alone  – no savings, just the pension and a son who passed away two years ago in 2015 due to a critical illness. She now lives alone.

Here’s what Tarabhai would do if she received the money (translated): “If I got some money, I would first pay my bills, my rent, and use that money to buy medicines. People like us don’t have it in our fate to see so much money, so I will thank god that so many people read my story and reached out to support me” 

Most widows of Sipahis like Tarabhai are widowed at the age when children learn how to spell the word marriage. They brave loneliness, harassment and grinding hard work to single-handedly hold together their families. They work long hours to put food on the mat, and live a long life filled with loneliness even before they turn 30.

Please help me make give them the dignity they deserve

Thank you !
4th August 2017
Dear Supporters,

Thank you for the tremendous support. You have been an integral part in helping us help a lot of people. We could not have done this without you. So far we were able to help close to 10 people who needed financial assistance directly and the rest has been transferred to Zila Sainik Parishad in the hope that we will be able to make a sustainable ecosystem to help these families. 

The funds that we were able to raise so far have been utilised in the following way. We have split it into two broad cases: 
  1. Emergency requirement
  2. Sustainable ecosystem

We were in constant touch with the officials from the Zila Sainik Parishad to understand how, if in any way possible, can we help in creating a sustainable ecosystem to help the families of the martyred soldiers. During our interactions, we found that a few families needed fund on a priority basis to meet their expenses. 

In one of these interactions, we came to know about Mrs Yadav. She lost her husband in 1971. She needed funds immediately as she had to cope with the medical expenses to treat her son. He was suffering from heart and prostate ailments. We got in touch with her and provided monetary assistance. He got treated and the process was a success. He is now the father of a mischievous boy. 

We are further increasing our target by an additional sum of Rs 10,00,000. We will be getting in touch with the officials of Army Welfare fund and other related entities to discuss on the best way to go ahead with the idea.

We have attached a few pictures of the event that we conducted at the Zila Sainik office, where we handed over the cheques to a few of the people who sought assistance.
Dear Supporters,

Thank you for the tremendous support. You have been an integral part in helping us help a lot of people. We could not have done this without you. So far we were able to help close to 10 people who needed financial assistance directly and the rest has been transferred to Zila Sainik Parishad in the hope that we will be able to make a sustainable ecosystem to help these families. 

The funds that we were able to raise so far have been utilised in the following way. We have split it into two broad cases: 
  1. Emergency requirement
  2. Sustainable ecosystem

We were in constant touch with the officials from the Zila Sainik Parishad to understand how, if in any way possible, can we help in creating a sustainable ecosystem to help the families of the martyred soldiers. During our interactions, we found that a few families needed fund on a priority basis to meet their expenses. 

In one of these interactions, we came to know about Mrs Yadav. She lost her husband in 1971. She needed funds immediately as she had to cope with the medical expenses to treat her son. He was suffering from heart and prostate ailments. We got in touch with her and provided monetary assistance. He got treated and the process was a success. He is now the father of a mischievous boy. 

We are further increasing our target by an additional sum of Rs 10,00,000. We will be getting in touch with the officials of Army Welfare fund and other related entities to discuss on the best way to go ahead with the idea.

We have attached a few pictures of the event that we conducted at the Zila Sainik office, where we handed over the cheques to a few of the people who sought assistance.